Recent Changes

Wednesday, April 3

  1. page People edited ... Anthony McCann I'm coming to the end of my employment at the University of Ulster, where I've…
    ...
    Anthony McCann
    I'm coming to the end of my employment at the University of Ulster, where I've been for 6 years, and will shortly be setting out on a freelance career. I'm a rampant interdisciplinarian, which has always left me being perceived by some as somewhat inappropriate for the university jobs I have taken up over the last 15 years. In a bid to find more joy in my work as an educationalist I recently started a community interest company called Hedgeschool21, which is still to find its feet and its identity, but the core idea was to try experiments in learning in Northern Ireland and see how people respond to them. Hedgeschools were an historical form of local education in Ireland for 150 years, and while they arose from very specific historic conditions, they provide us with a lot of lessons, I think, for developing mobile, adaptable, and personalised approaches to education. I'll be working on Hedgeschool21 more actively after my university job finishes in July. I'm interested in the affectual dimensions of learning - emotional climate, quality of relationship, generosity, trust ... I've been working for the last 15 years on developing, on the one hand, a systematic model of the dynamics of personal and sociological enclosure, and, on the other, a systematic political theory based around the notion of gentleness. Some of my research (and songs) can be found at http://www.anthonymccann.com
    John Graves
    PhD Student, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand
    Founder of SlideSpeech
    Goal: a wikipedia-like resource of learning materials
    Tool: a collaborative text-to-speech-based presentation platform which includes interactivity like this (more links at end of presentation).

    (view changes)

Tuesday, January 8

Monday, July 30

  1. page resources edited READING AND OTHER USEFUL THINGS A relevant CFP TEL, the crisis & the response There was a…

    READING AND OTHER USEFUL THINGS
    A relevant CFP TEL, the crisis & the response
    There was a recent edition of 'Futures' focused on Futures and Education - this is worth a look at. The papers are uploaded here
    {science.pdf} - editorial, including summary of different approaches to thinking about futures
    (view changes)
    4:04 am

Monday, April 16

  1. page Political engagment? edited ... It was observed that think tanks, some independent, of various sorts had been extremely influe…
    ...
    It was observed that think tanks, some independent, of various sorts had been extremely influential in representing interests and influencing policy at government level. These think tanks usually play a long game, i.e. current health and education policies (front door and back door privatisation strategies) were a long time in preparation while the conservative party was in opposition and long before then. One possibility for this group is to organise and strategise along the lines of a think tank. This might mean the informal and selective use of some features of extant think tanks as a model of organisation and engagement. It may lead to a formally constituted think tank in due course. Either way, the suggestion is not that the group/network becomes a think tank. It would be one activity or strategy amongst others, if at all.
    Some research would be necessary on think tanks – how they are constituted, organised, their modes of development and engagement with publics and political institutions and organisations. A good place to start is Adam Curtis's epic blogpost/story on the history of thinktanks from the 1950s to the present day There is a useful list of current UK thinktanks based on website popularity by New Think Tank (who are launching later this year, although I haven't quite got a handle on what they are doing from their website).
    ...
    engaging with.
    EDIT 16/4 WP: Mark Carrigan (who I suggest would be a good person to invite to a future #e4c meeting) wrote interesting, critical summary of role of right-wing think tanks in Coalition's agenda, noting how the erosion of the mainstream media's business models (fewer staff and checking of facts) increases the chances of think tank press releases and opinions being reprinted uncritically. The TPA have set the gold standard in this, illustrated by the number of current news stories quoting them.

    A kind of think tank, but who seem to focus more on do-ing than think-ing is the Young Foundation, can't vouch for their work but the ethos crosses over with the discussion we had about showcasing good practice and linking it to academic evidence.
    This discussion seemed to overlap with discussions other groups were having - should we try to constitute ourselves as a network of some sort, should we set ourselves up as a research group, could we as a group with a wide variety of expertise as doers (who think) and thinkers (who do) set up a speaker panel or circuit, how can we support freelance and independent practitioners and scholars...? We could continue the discussion here if anyone is interested. If any sort of consensus should emerge on this and this takes off into any sort of activity I would be happy to take a share of whatever it takes to make progress (Terry).
    ...
    Conservatives: the current formation of capitalism has been attacked from the left and the right within the Tory party. Zac Goldsmith echoed the call for 'responsible capitalism' (whatever that is).
    Labour: Ed Miliband has a solid background on the environment, having been Sec for Climate Change and Energy, and also dabbled with the responsible capitalism ideas.
    Mark Carrigan
    (view changes)
    2:53 am

Thursday, April 12

Wednesday, April 11

  1. page Britain is not a business park edited Won't make a habit of this, but posting text of an article as it's paywall only (Times). A piece b…
    Won't make a habit of this, but posting text of an article as it's paywall only (Times). A piece by Simon Barnes reclaiming the importance of humanity and nature in the face of "UK plc" etc.
    top
    {http://www.lexisnexis.com/uk/nexis/results/docview/attachRetrieve.do?csi=10939&A=0.5848897889508154&risb=21_T14437967449&urlEnc=ISO-8859-1&smi=LOGOS&key=30374&componentseq=1&type=logo&pap=single} Publication Logo
    The Times (London)
    March 24, 2012 Saturday
    Edition 1;
    National Edition
    This Ozzy (Osborne) has no song in his soul;
    Wild Notebook
    BYLINE: Simon Barnes
    SECTION: FEATURES; Pg. 22
    LENGTH: 796 words
    Have you ever wanted to tap a politician on the shoulder and say: "Excuse me old thing, but this is a real country you are governing, and it's full of real people who don't share your obsession with politics and power. We just want a decent life."
    No doubt the politician would merely snort: "I know the sort of people you mean. The sort of people who don't make any trouble. The sort of people not worth taking trouble for, in other words. Now be off with you, I have an important meeting with important people. It's important people who matter, after all. Important people like - well, me ..." Which brings us to this chap George Osborne. Chancellor, I believe. Been in the news for some reason this week. Last autumn, he criticised the Habitats and Wild Birds Directives, which are European regulations for internationally important sites for wildlife. To put that another way, they are sites for which Britain has a global responsibility.
    Mr Osborne described them in his Autumn Budget statement - not a throwaway remark, then - as "a ridiculous cost on British business". Absurd things like newts and voles and bats and barn owls getting in the way of important things like money and power: it's not to be thought of. It's a view that you find wherever important people sit down to discuss important things.
    "See what I mean, 007? Just the sort of mare's nest these old women's societies are always stirring up. People start preserving something - churches, old houses, decaying pictures, birds - and there's always a hullabaloo of some sort. The trouble is these sort of people get really worked up about their damned birds or whatever it is ... So I'm supposed to do what? Send a submarine to the island? For what? To find out what's happened to a covey of pink storks."
    M's words at the beginning of Dr No: echoed by Ozzy Osborne in his words about the habitats directive and no doubt echoed on a daily basis by important people across the country.
    There are two reasons why Ozzy is wrong. The first is that the directive in question does not operate at a cost to British business. That is the conclusion the Government itself has just reached. Defra's review of the habitat regulations showed that the only problems with the directive were to do with attitude and rhetoric.
    Environmental safeguards, it concluded, do not place a brake on economic development. In fact, there are many examples of wildlife contributing to prosperity: to take a tiny example, my local pub would close if they didn't get so many clients coming to Suffolk for the famous RSPB reserve at Minsmere.
    Wildlife and business are not forever in opposition. It is not the case that one is rooted in the past and the other in the future: or if it is, it's the other way round from the way most important people think. Opposition to regulations on wildlife is an irrational piece of political posturing designed to make you look like an important person.
    And what if it was a cost? What if protecting wildlife really was a burden on business? Shouldn't that be a burden that business is happy to bear? After all Britain is a country, not a business park. I don't see Britain as just a place for making money in; do you?
    The problem with important people is that they think about work too much. Therefore, they only see Britain as a workplace. If Britain is not doing all kinds of things so that people can make money, then it is failing. Which is all fair enough in its way: but we unimportant people don't see that as the whole story.
    Britain is also a place to play in. A place to take holidays, walk in the countryside, sit in the pub garden, swim in the sea, walk to work through the park, take a weekend away from the city. If you wish to take a reductive view, you could say that the wilder parts of Britain were essential to keep the workforce functioning.
    I don't suppose important people talk about souls very often. I don't suppose they discuss the things we need for the good of our souls, or their duty to safeguard the soul of Britain. Perhaps important people only think of souls in terms of buying and selling.
    But look here: what a week. I bet your soul was stirred, same as mine was. Spring arriving like an express train. Blossom exploding on to trees. Primroses almost rudely thrusting themselves into being. Blackbirds singing with the glorious sweetness they specialise in; song thrush adding his own contribution, singing each song twice over, lest you think he never could recapture the first fine careless rapture.
    It's been a week of careless rapture - a week that's been good for our souls: one that reminds us that we've all got one, and so does the country we live in. Work and money are all very fine and dandy, but we need more. And business can be a ridiculous cost on British souls.

    (view changes)
    6:24 am

Tuesday, April 10

  1. page Political engagment? edited One of the breakout sessions, reported back by Warren, was on the possible approach to political en…
    One of the breakout sessions, reported back by Warren, was on the possible approach to political engagement, should this be a path we choose. The key question seemed to be, given the objective to find a way of transforming education so that it adequately addresses the reality of the crisis and its various dimensions (economic, environmental, accountability and dehumanisation) is it still worth trying to shape policy from within the formal political parties or, if not, engaging more broadly with groups and constituencies within civil society. It might be useful if those participating in this discussion could edit this page and fill out some of the discussion that took place. To get the ball rolling...
    It was observed that think tanks, some independent, of various sorts had been extremely influential in representing interests and influencing policy at government level. These think tanks usually play a long game, i.e. current health and education policies (front door and back door privatisation strategies) were a long time in preparation while the conservative party was in opposition and long before then. One possibility for this group is to organise and strategise along the lines of a think tank. This might mean the informal and selective use of some features of extant think tanks as a model of organisation and engagement. It may lead to a formally constituted think tank in due course. Either way, the suggestion is not that the group/network becomes a think tank. It would be one activity or strategy amongst others, if at all.
    ...
    and organisations. A good place to start is Adam Curtis's epic blogpost/story on the history of thinktanks from the 1950s to the present day There is a useful list of current UK thinktanks based on website popularity by New Think Tank (who are launching later this year, although I haven't quite got a handle on what they are doing from their website).
    There
    may be
    ...
    dog, apparently Camerons' favourite),Cameron's favourite - extensive, useful history here), The Centre
    ...
    engaging with.
    A kind of think tank, but who seem to focus more on do-ing than think-ing is the Young Foundation, can't vouch for their work but the ethos crosses over with the discussion we had about showcasing good practice and linking it to academic evidence.

    This discussion seemed to overlap with discussions other groups were having - should we try to constitute ourselves as a network of some sort, should we set ourselves up as a research group, could we as a group with a wide variety of expertise as doers (who think) and thinkers (who do) set up a speaker panel or circuit, how can we support freelance and independent practitioners and scholars...? We could continue the discussion here if anyone is interested. If any sort of consensus should emerge on this and this takes off into any sort of activity I would be happy to take a share of whatever it takes to make progress (Terry).
    Political Parties (Warren)
    A quick note on the state of the parties, inspired by the idea that it might be easier to influence a lot of these than one might think. I'm highlighting potential points of influence, sympathetic ears within parties.
    Greens: maybe the most obvious choice, certainly re environment/resource issues, and have steadily grown in power in recent years (MP, MEPs, councillors and are largest party in Brighton council). Education policy is here.
    Pirate Party: seem to be gaining ground in Germany and other parts of Europe. Say they are not on traditional left-right spectrum. Pushing openness and technologically literate policy agenda. There's a good FT article on them I've archived here, and a great one in Spiegel on how they are organised called "The Politics of Shitstorms", a phrase that might tie in with E4C! Also noted that Vinay Gupta, who you may be familiar with as @leashless, has joined up with them in UK.
    Conservatives: the current formation of capitalism has been attacked from the left and the right within the Tory party. Zac Goldsmith echoed the call for 'responsible capitalism' (whatever that is).
    Labour: Ed Miliband has a solid background on the environment, having been Sec for Climate Change and Energy, and also dabbled with the responsible capitalism ideas.

    (view changes)
    4:39 pm

Thursday, April 5

  1. page resources edited ... Making do and Making good: How not to waste a good crisis View another webinar from davidjen…
    ...
    Making do and Making good: How not to waste a good crisis
    View another webinar from davidjennings
    <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
    EDUCATION FOR THE INEVITABLE: Schooling When the Oil Runs Out
    Climate change due to global warming, peak oil, and economic chaos are beginning to impact on our lives – and inevitably will escalate.
    Schools, instead of preparing children for the me-first, greed-is-good culture of today’s capitalism, should educate for convivial survival.
    Convivial survival, if the economy collapses, will depend upon communities working co-operatively and being partly self-reliant.
    Hence, in schools, children should learn to collaborate, not compete and to work in self-reliant teams in an ethos of conviviality.
    * * * * * *
    Conviviality entails seeking harmony with one’s social, cultural and natural environments and oneself, leading to the joy of a good life.
    Conviviality is the ethos of social justice, environmental stewardship, ecological sanity, healthy communities, and the good life.
    Conviviality is an alternative ethos to wealth-creating and economic growth as the driving force of society.
    Growth is needed to turn infancy into adolescence into adulthood; thereafter growth is a cancer which eventually kills.
    The UK, like other western societies, has reached adulthood and should recognise the danger of further economic growth. It is a cancer.
    * * * * * *
    As oil prices escalate personal transport will be seriously restricted: walking, cycling and limited public transport will become the norm.
    In consequence children will need to attend the nearest schools - on foot or bicycle. Hence every school must be a good school.
    * * * * * *
    Good schools grow from the inside by the co-operative efforts of teachers, pupils, parents and governors: collegial organisation is best.
    In collegial schools teachers work as colleagues, deciding curriculum, pedagogy and assessment – supported but not directed by government.
    Goodbye to government edicts, Ofsted inspections, examination pressures, league tables. They damage, do not make, good schools.
    The public trusts teachers. Ipsos MORI poll in 2009: ‘Who tells the truth?’ Government ministers: 16%; business leaders: 25%; teachers: 88%
    It is teachers, working collegially with governors and local community who should decide what and how children learn and are assessed.
    The only external assessment should be Tomlinson diplomas at the end of schooling. Accountability should be ‘bottom-up’ – not ‘top down’.
    * * * * * *
    Teachers will have an essential role in developing community life in the near future. They must walk tall in society.
    Teacher training needs to include ‘convivial and sustainable futures’. Perhaps each student with an allotment growing some food.
    ‘There is no higher calling. Without teachers, society would slide back into primitive squalor’. (Ted Wragg)
    These 20 ‘tweets’ are a summary of my book, title as above, published 2011 by Book Guild Publishing, Brighton.
    Michael Bassey 6 April 2012 I discussed bits of it at our Leicester meeting. Would love to have comments.
    (I'd numbered them 1 to 20 - but they've come out as all number 1!)
    <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

    (view changes)

Tuesday, April 3

  1. page space.menu edited ... Resources Events Political engagment? [[include component="navigation"]]
    ...
    Resources
    Events
    Political engagment?
    [[include component="navigation"]]
    (view changes)
    12:09 pm
  2. page Events edited ... Please note: unfortunately, because of space limitations, this is a closed, invitation-only ev…
    ...
    Please note: unfortunately, because of space limitations, this is a closed, invitation-only event for the time being. If you'd like to stay in touch, please email Keri Facer.
    10.30 - 5.30, Timetable
    Location: Room 2.03 (up the stairs), Eric Wood Building, no. 8 on the campus map [pdf]. Enter the building by the entrance on Gateway Street. Walking directions from Train Station.
    Lunchtime marketplace (please sign up)

    Participants
    To prepareNotes from sessions at this event
    Political engagement?
    A Guide
    for the day, we'd really appreciate it if you could
    send a 250 word description of yourself, or what you're working on and what you're interested in and what you'd like support with in remaking education to address these crises -- or add it directly to the People page
    let us know definitely if you would like one of the 15 minute informal lunchtime slots (we'll try to accommodate everyone, but it may be first come first serve as we already have more tentative suggestions than we can provide spaces for) and a one liner on what you'd like to show/start a conversation about
    Low/no-cost Learning
    Other events at which Education for Crisis features
    Dec 2011: Whole Education Conference
    ...
    Mar 2012: ASCL National Conference -- David
    April 2012: Workshop with Somerset Schools
    ...
    & Keri
    October 2012: NAHT October National Conference - Richard, Helen, Keri
    ...
    (view changes)
    12:08 pm

More